Bottled Water Battles

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International Bottled Water Association Disputes New York Times Article On Children’s Cavity Rates

The International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) issued the following statement regarding a March 6, 2012, New York Times article concerning recent increases in children’s cavity rates.

 

The International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) issued the following statement regarding a March 6, 2012, New York Times article concerning recent increases in children’s cavity rates:

“The New York Times article, Preschoolers in Surgery for a Mouthful of Cavities, (March 6, 2012), notes that the causes of increased dental problems in young children vary, from a simple lack of brushing to too many sugary foods and beverages. Unfortunately, the article also incorrectly states that drinking bottled water instead of `fluoridated tap water’ can contribute to tooth decay.  This statement is both inaccurate and misleading. There is absolutely no correlation between consumption of bottled water and an increase in cavities. In fact, bottled water does not contain ingredients that cause cavities, such as sugar.

For consumers who want fluoride in their drinking water and wish to choose bottled water, approximately 20 IBWA member companies make clearly-labeled fluoridated bottled water products under stringent FDA guidelines. For a complete list of these brands, which are available in many markets across the country, please visit IBWA’s Website, http://www.bottledwater.org/fluoride.

There are many sources of fluoride, and the amount of fluoride exposure varies greatly by community and individual. Approximately two-thirds of communities in the Unites States fluoridate their public drinking water supplies. Those who live in communities that do not fluoridate public drinking water, who get their drinking water from wells, or who filter their fluoridated tap water will not be getting fluoride in their drinking water. Fluoride is present in many foods and beverages and almost all toothpaste contains fluoride. Too much exposure to fluoride can lead to a condition called fluorosis, which results in stains to the teeth. Consumers should therefore look at how much fluoride they are receiving as part of an overall diet and should contact their health-care provider or dental-care provider for their recommendation.

 

As a packaged food product, comprehensively regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), bottled water labels must contain the name and place of business of the bottler, packer or distributor, and virtually all bottled water products provide a telephone number. With this information, consumers may contact the bottled water company directly to obtain information about the product. Bottled water companies must also follow fluoride labeling guidelines should fluoride be added to the product or be present at a naturally occurring level as set for the by FDA regulation (21C.F.R. §165.110(b).

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3 thoughts on “Bottled Water Battles

  1. Pingback: FLUORIDE CLASS ACTION » Cardiovascular Damage From Fluoride

  2. Olemara Peters

    The IBWA statement is in some ways a helpful rebuttal of the NY Times article. However, it contains one grossly misleading sentence:
    ” Those who live in communities that do not fluoridate public drinking water, who get their drinking water from wells, or who filter their fluoridated tap water will not be getting fluoride in their drinking water.”
    This statement dismisses not only a) endogenous (natural) calcium fluoride (in private and unfluoridated-municipal supplies), and b) hydrofluorosilicic acid etc. from upriver municipalities’ wastewater-treatment plants (which do nothing to remove fluoride), but (most directly) c) the fact that water filters mostly DO NOT remove fluoride. Anyone shopping for water-purification equipment (hoping for fluoride-removal) needs to check the specs. most attentively (for not only the fluoride ppm in the resultant water, but also the duration/gallons for which the improvement is claimed). For starters, any equipment sold as a “water filter” probably by-definition does not remove fluoride (all, or significant, or possibly any).
    Also, people need to know that many labs use .5 ppm as their Minimum Detection Level (thus, any fluoride, up to .49ppm — that’s about 250 times higher than in mother’s milk — will be listed as “None Detectable”). Altogether, in order to “not get fluoride in their drinking water” (whether bottled, tap, or “filtered”) people have to get in the habit of asking a lot more questions than this statement claims.

  3. Jim

    Remember the FTC federal trade commission had warned Nursery water they made claims that their fluoridated water would produce a likely positive health effect. They were ordered to reduce the claim of benefit or else be at risk of fine and seizing product. They reduced the claims slightly but still claim benefit for infants teeth.
    The Nidel lawsuit in Maryland Federal court against Nestle and Gerber should have gotten some attention. The 13 year old girl had 17 teeth with ugly mild damage and is seeking triple damages as this could be expected by those putting fluoride in water. Even the CDC has admitted 41% of 12-15 year olds have this condition but then say it is rare and not really detectable in their Press releases. Dishonest at best. some stores even have house brand extra fluoride water aimed at kids. Publix has a warning to ask your dentist first. This makes it seem a dentist is qualified to know whole body effects of any toxin not knowing intake or other sources. Of course the ADA and CDC both tell us it is safe and effective for all. Bernie Maydoff was just as honest but only took money not their health.

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